Help for Healing

Bitter & Sweet, living daily with grief

GUEST BLOG PART 2

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Hopefully you caught Part 1 of the “interview” with RidingBitch blog writer Niva Dorell Smith. She has answered the same questions that I did on a previous blog. They hold profound thoughts so enjoy.

Q: Had you had any previous experience with caregiving before your husband Kaz was diagnosed with a Stage IV Glioblastoma in 2010?
A. Yes and no. My mother had been in and out of hospitals for much of my childhood. In fact, her health is why my family moved to the United States from Israel when I was five years old. She had several open heart surgeries and other major procedures from that time until her death 17 years later. I was never her caregiver because I was too young, but I had grown up with a familiarity with hospitals, doctors, nurses, and the fear of possibly losing a loved one. When Kaz first started having symptoms, then was diagnosed, I think he was surprised by how calm and steady I was. Before then, he had always been the calm, steady one between us. Of course, inside I was a ball of emotions, but on the outside I was calm.
Once things progressed with him it was a different story. I was still relatively calm but the stress of the situation sometimes got to me. I found it very challenging to be so powerless, to watch him suffer and not be able to do much about it, to have opinions on how to deal with things and not be able to make them happen. The patient is in charge of his own body, as it should be. I used to think of my father a lot, and my older siblings. They were the ones who took care of my mother all those years.

Q: Are there any specific things that you would advise caregivers?
A. Well, like you I would suggest having a notebook and writing everything down. The caregiver must be quite organized because there’s a ton of information to keep track of and the patient usually can’t think straight. I found myself relating to this aspect of caregiving a bit like film production. My skills as a director, production manager, and assistant editor – all jobs which require a lot of organization, communication and the ability to function efficiently under pressure – came in handy when I became a caregiver. I was an efficient caregiver and a strong advocate, but emotionally I was sometimes a nervous wreck.
I would also recommend support groups. Kaz and I had different opinions about this. We went to a brain tumor support group twice, once in the beginning, once in the end. The first time he rode his motorcycle and strode in with his helmet and was pretty uncomfortable with the whole thing. The second time was several months after his motorcycle accident and about 7 weeks before he died. He was on a cane and had been depressed. His mindset was completely different and he enjoyed the group much more. I always wished we had kept going to that group because we would have learned a lot and been able to connect with other brain tumor patients and caregivers. I ended up going to a caregiver’s support group, which was also very helpful. It was the only place where I could vent honestly about my feelings and be heard and understood without judgment. I also learned a great deal from the other caregivers, some of whom had been doing it for over 10 years.
Having down time is also important. Being a caregiver can be extremely stressful and challenging to get any time away from the situation. I took up swimming for a while, which was great. But you can do lots of things – yoga, walking, meditation, retail therapy. Whatever gets your mind off things or allows you to relax, if only for a few minutes a week. Your brain and body will thank you.
Lastly, I would urge caregivers to not be shy about asking for help. People often feel helpless when a friend or family member is sick. They want to know how they can help. So, if you need help, ask for it. Except for the last 6 weeks, I worked full-time the entire year Kaz was ill. I could never have managed without the help of our friends and family. We were also very lucky that our respective bosses were very supportive. This made all the difference in the world.

Q: What was your experience of caregiving for your husband like?
A. Stressful. Beautiful. Scary. Frustrating. Profoundly emotional. I once told Kaz that I felt honored to be with him during this very important period of his life, to take care of him and be his partner, even though it was challenging. The stress could have torn our young relationship apart, and almost did, to be honest. But it also brought us closer together. Dealing with someone’s health is an intimate experience and scary too, because it makes you face your own mortality. We loved each other enough to stick with it and look down the barrel of the beast together. It was odd to fall more in love while knowing we would soon be separated forever. Odd, painful and beautiful, all at once.

THANKS NIVA. I was moved reading your responses and felt like yelling out AMEN SISTER!! Stay tuned everyone. There is more to come!

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Author: helpforhealing

Darcy Thiel, MA is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in NY State. She earned her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology from Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL. Ms. Thiel has been a couple and family therapist in West Seneca, New York since the mid-1990’s. Ms. Thiel is currently an adjunct professor at Medaille College in Buffalo, NY. She is also an accomplished speaker and presenter on various topics throughout the Western NY area. She is the proud author of Bitter and Sweet: A Family’s Journey with Cancer, the prequel to Life After Death, on This Side of Heaven. To learn more about Ms. Thiel and other exciting books from Baby Coop Publishing, LLC, visit her website at www.babycooppublishing.com or www.darcythiel.com Copyright Help for Healing by Darcy Thiel © 2012-2016. All rights reserved.

2 thoughts on “GUEST BLOG PART 2

  1. Pingback: Darcy Thiel Talks Publishing (Industry Friday #14) | Riding Bitch

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